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Often used by Turkish and middle eastern immigrants, particularly to describe police who will beat or assault them when no witnesses are present.Derived from the Rastafari movement which, in turn, relies upon a Babylon (New Testament) interpretation symbolising debauchery, corruption and evil-doing in general.(Ambulances are yellow and green, fire service yellow and red and transport (motorway) yellow and balck. The backs of all vehicles are red/yellow inverted chevrons - only red/yellow because the other colours are not legal on the back.

"To go jack on a mate" is the act of betraying associates or implicating them in a crime. French, used in the plural "les keufs", as slang for the police.The term was used as the title of the 2014 British police drama Babylon.American term used in this singular form to refer to any number of police officers as well as when referring to an entire police force or to police in general.A "jack (insert colourful name here)" is someone who is considered not be trusted. UK, police traffic car, from the now largely obsolete historical colour-scheme – an overall white vehicle, with a longitudinal red, or red and yellow, stripe on each side. This word is more derogatory than "les flics", even though it means the same thing.The word is derived from the pronunciation of "flic" as "FLEE-KUH".Police services also have their own internal slang and jargon; some of it is relatively widespread geographically and some very localized.

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